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20121001
20121031
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LINKTV 21
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English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the ideas into a concise and cohesive composition. this is the california landscape, the rolling hills in a giant ellipse. and it's as if the land was cut apart or sectioned so that you could see into it. the memory of the land is embedded in it. and inside of this ellipse, you see the man who, at the very beginning of los angeles, sold ice creams even before there was a city. the river that moves central to this land base, that is first water, and then concrete, and then water again, is sort of a wish for the future. the quiva at the center, which is the home place, the oven, the womb, as it were. the little, tiny houses that represent first sonora town, east los angeles, all the way through to chavez ravine. and in the land, the sleeping giant, who represents the mexicano/latino population of this region, awakes. first sleeping as a female, then male, then a female who o has the borr hammered into her back, awakes. and her hand pours out the blood that becomes this kind of march of humanity led by a spirit warrior, who is an azteca. i guess i've always been a visual artist. i was kno
. claro, y ahí conoció a raquel. pues, sí. nos conocimos en la universidad de california. ¿te acuerdas? en este episodio vamos a ver cómo se pide en un restaurante. ¿en qué consiste una cena? ¿qué se dice en un restaurante? primero, viene el camarero a preguntarles a los clientes qué van a tomar. ¿desean algo de tomar? después, el camarero les pregunta si quieren un plato para comenzar. ¿no desean algo para comenzar? también les toma la orden para el plato principal. ¿están listos para ordenar? luis: después viví muchos años en nueva york por razones de trabajo. pero ahora he vuelto a los angeles para quedarme. captioning of this program is made possible by the annenberg/cpb project and the geraldine r. dodge foundation. en el episodio previo angela y roberto iban a conocer a su abuelo, don fernando. estaban un poco nerviosos. por fin conoceremos al abuelo. estoy... ¿nerviosa? sí, pero... muy contenta. entiendo perfectamente. yo también. raquel: arturo, ino está! ¿cómo? don fernando no está. ila habitación está vacía! al entrar raquel en el cuarto de don fernando d
rides per day. narrator: japan is a mountainous country roughly the size of california. this physical geography has contributed to densely populated cities, and made japan one of the most highly urbanized countries in the world. over 80% of its population lives in urban areas. tokyo is japan's largest city. as the capital, it is the focus of most legal, pitical, and economic activities in the nation. most large corporations have their headquarters here. everything tends to concentrate in tokyo. 32 million people, or one out of every four japanese live within a 30-mile radius. while tokyo casts a large shadow, it covers only three percent of the total land mass of japan. land prices here have skyrocketed. a booming economy in the 1980s and early 1990s saw profits go into real estate speculation, contributing to a bubble of inflated values. affordable housing was in short supply. more and more people began moving out to the suburbs to fulfill their dream of owning a home. by the mid-90s, japan hit an economic slump and thasian economic crisis of 1997 hit. the bubble burst and land price
at walmart supply warehouses in california and florida workers demanding fairer workplace conditions. a buffalo man has won the right to sue the manufacturer, distributor, and dealer of the pistol used to shoot him nearly a decade ago. daniel williams was a high school basketball star when he was shot and badly wounded in 2003. on friday, a new york state court ruled williams can take legal action against the ohio- based weapons manufacturer beemiller and distributor mks supply for knowingly selling weapons to irresponsible dealers. the dealer who purchased the guns in williams' case is a convicted felon who was barred from buying weapons. in a statement, the british campaign to prevent gun violence said -- -- the brady campaign to prevent gun violence said, -- an unarmed 22-year-old hispanic american man has been shot dead by new york city police. noel polanco was driving on the grand central parkway in queens when police approached him at a traffic stop. police say polanco was shot after reaching for something in his vehicle, but a witness says his hands remained on the steering wh
, there's been a well known set of responses that people get when they breathe southern california-type air pollution. eye irritation, you know, irritation in the chest, cough, things of this sort-- but the real question that i think some of us have been interested in is what does this repeated kind of experience result in, as far as permanent, chronic damage to the lung, or anything else? health officials suspect that air pollution may be a factor in diseases such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and lung cancer. it can also intensify the breathing difficulties people with asthma experience. john peters: if you divide the population into asthmatics and non-asthmatics, there's a striking relationship within the asthmatics as to air pollution level, and frequency of cough and phlegm-- it's twice as much in the more polluted communities than the less polluted communities. nine years ago, the california air resources board initiated a study to determine the long-term effects of air pollution on health. their subjects? 5,000 school-aged children living in 12 southern california commun
into california in the 1960s, and into expansion within the inner city ghettos of san francisco and los angeles. so, as the group moved and expanded its traditional christian commitment to social justice, equality, and so on, it changed, and some of the members tended to be more politically committed, with less of an emphasis on christianity. >> social justice, inclusiveness, caring about the poor - these are great ideals. how do we go from these beautiful ideals to tragic suicide in the jungles of guyana? >> i think it's really hard to understand why people who join a group with high intentions and noble ideals end up ultimately killing their children and themselves. and i don't think anyone who joined people's temple in the beginning ever thought or imagined that they would end up on the cover of newsweek as a dead body. but what happens, i think, as you become part of an organization that requires total commitment, you begin to make compromises, which are justified by your faith and commitment - that your goal is worthy; racial equality is something that we want. however, if you begin to coe
the world, in california, are clues to understanding the fall of mesopotamia, as farmers here struggle to overcome a threat to this fertile garden land. the ruins of ancient societies may hold keys to our own survival as, out of the past, archaeologists explore one of the greatest of mysteries -- the decline and fall of grand civilizations. mission control: ignition... and liftoff. liftoff... keach: for more than five millennia, humankind has seemed to dominate earth, both creating and destroying grand civilizations. each of these human experiments has changed our planet. this high vantage point brings us a new and sobering view. for the first time, we behold our world as finite, limited. on the darkened face of earth, the lights of cities record the expansion of our kind. just 50 years ago, two billion people lived on earth. today our global population has reached five billion. within the next generation, it will double once more. our exponential growth now threatens the very resources that sustain life. the abandoned ruins of ancient societies hold clues to our survival. but to learn
... costa rica, is significantly different than might occur in california or in michigan. and so we have to be aware that there are potentially different... risks in terms of those foods. the other is that we've figured out a way to mass produce and mass distribute foods in a volume that we've ver been able to do . and we have a variety of new food products-- prepackaged salads-- and while in general these products are quite safe, the problem is that if something does go wrong, it can go wrong on a very large-scale basis. the traditional outbreak that we think about-- the bad potato salad on a vat the church supper,. you know-- still does occur, but what we see more and more of is we see very low levels of contamination in a product that may be distributed very widely in a large number of states. in order to get a handle on these widely dispersed cases, the cdc is turning to technology. one of the ways that we've been doing that is similar to what the fbi does in terms to having a national database of fingerprints of criminals. anytime one of those bugs is isolated, either from a human s
's it hit? begin with a cal f-o-r-n-i-- so california is a much warmer place in the winter than east coast communities of the same latitude. ain't that neat, okay? in fact, any place that's surrounded by water has just about the same temperature all year round. how about the best place in the world, right here? [laughter] that's hawaii, huh? the hawaiian islands, okay? the hawaiian islands about the same temperature all year round, but not only the hawaiian islands. iceland way up here has about the same temperature all year round, yeah. surrounded by water, okay? when it tends to be cold, the cooling water would heat it up. when it tends to be hot, the warming water will cool it down. so water acts as a moderator. aren't you glad that water has a high specific heat? yum, yum, itad to do with the world we live in, yeah? something else about water, kind of neat too. water is the only substance-- the only commosubstance that will expand when you change it from the liquid state to the solid state. did you guys know that? see, ice will float on top of wate why? during the freezing, the ice mus
in... costa rica, is significantly different than might occur in california or in michigan. and so we have to be aware that there are potentially different... risks in terms of those foods. the other is that we've figured out a way to mass produce and mass distribute foods in a volume that we've never been able to do re. and we have a variety of new food products-- prepackaged salads-- and while in general these products are quite safe, the problem is that if something does go wrong, it can go wrong on a very large-scale basis. the traditional outbreak that we think about-- the bad potato salad at the church supper, you know-- still does occur, but what we see more and more of is we see very low levels of contamination in a product that may be distributed very widely in a large number of states. in order to get a handle on these widely dispersed cases, the cdc is turning to technology. one of the ways that we've been doing that is similar to what the fbi does in terms to having a national database of fingerprints of criminals. anytime one of those bugs is isolated, either from a human
is not, in this case, the capital of california; we're talking about the sacrament - that's a great one - juan told me that on the break. we're talking about another key point here. it's taking the ordinary and transforming it into the extraordinary. i mean, that's - sacrament, sacrifice; ascending, descending. i love those balances between the two, because in the sacrament, the divine descends as the human sacrifices some sense of their limited sense of self, and ascends. and somewhere in that wonderful mixture between divine and human, there's transformation, and so the sacramental element is really in there. this, though, you can find - i always get nervous when i start comparing deeply held spiritual things to rather mundane things - but you can still see this. you can go out and toss around a football in the big stadium, big football stadium here at governor state, and eh, nothing's going to happen. but you take that simple act of throwing around the football and playing the game, and you put it in the context of the super bowl, and you have amazing extraordinary powers. remind me
to north-central florida and think, "hmm, you know, "if california can move their water across the state, why don't we go ahead and do that?" so, we are interested in understanding what the requirements of the natural system are and also understanding how major land uses in that basin, particularly agriculture, affect the water quality in the river. narrator: the suwannee river basin faces two major obstacles in the future -- increased demand and increased pollution. an average 1,000 people move into the region daily, using freshwater for their homes and septic systems. pollution levels in the basin are also increased when farmers spread fertilizers high in nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrate, on crops for increased yields. the excess fertilizer not used by the crops can be carried to rivers, causing algae and other plants to grow. this can change water quality, rendering it unfit for human consumption. dr. graham's task is to produce mathematical models used to predict how these factors and others work together to determine the health of the ecosystem. with these models, she hopes
possible by southern california consortium a close look at the earth's intricate system of running water is a close look at the evolution of earth's landscape. as they continue to shape the land around us, rivers and streams leave behind evidence of their enduring power. unlike earthquakes and volcanoes, which can cause sudden change, running water works slowly, almost imperceptibly, in shaping earth's landscape. we usually think of the grand canyon in terms of its rocks and the fascinating story that they contain, one that spans almost half of earth history. but there's more to the grand canyon than rocks. the canyon itself is a geologically active feature, a changing and evolving land form that's a monument to the power of running water. the colorado river carved this enormous valley over the last nine million years. in fact, the river carries about half a million tons of sediment past any point in the canyon every day. no wonder this great river has been described as too thin to walk on, but too thick to drink. rivers like the colorado, are powerful geologic agents that disrupt and re
community, and this is mostly people of color-- i've seen this also in the california-- mexican-american, texas-- there's a liquor store on every corner. narrator: besides alcohol and tobacco-- both legal drugs-- what drugs are commonly abused? there are a wide variety of different types of compounds that are considered abused or addictive from the traditional hard drugs of abuse, heroin and cocaine, to more commonly used drugs, some of which are used medically for therapeutics, sedative, hypnotics, tranquilizers. others are... like marijuana, alcohol, caffeine... on a gradient from the more exotic to the very commonplace, even considered dietary and often considered non-drugs. but there's a behavioral commonality across these. individuals can develop behavioral dependence on all of these compounds. narrator: some addictions are viewed as relatively harmless, like caffeine. dr. bigelow: one can become physically dependent on surprisingly low doses of caffeine. it appears that only about 100 milligrams a day is sufficient to produce physical dependence. that's the equivalent of t
valley, in noe valley in california a few years ago. a couple are sitting in their hot tub, and they had a faulty heater. and the heater kept heating and heating and heating and the people just kinda get drowsy, get drowsy and stayed right in there and cooked alive. oh, i mean cooked dead, okay? yeah, people the same way. as long as you make delta t small, small, small, small, small, you'll get used to it. you'll feel no pain, and you're just kinda check out. this has an interesting application. that you can reverse to-- say again. that you can everse to-- i think it's the same thing as with colder too. if you get gradually, gradually, gradually, you will accept it. you will become used to it people are like that. we become used to all sorts of adversity if it's given to us n small enough doses. like the name--you want, like sound and effect. and you could walk into a friend's factory and go in there and say, "my god, how could-- it's so noisy. how can you stand it in here?" he say, "oh, i get used to it. "when i came here, there was two machines going "and then three and then four and t
>> coming up on "california country," find out why it's always a time to celebrate citrus in california and now more than ever, thanks to some pint-sized products. >> it's like a nice little snack that people have. it's--i don't know. i mean, they kind of-- they make me happy. >> then see why making wine is music to these men's ears. >> ♪ this is dedicated to the one i... ♪ >> now he's gonna sing. >> ♪ love >> well, sort of. heh. next, they're a salad staple, but not all greens are created equal. find out how to pick the best and what to do with them. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] for anybody who has tried a piece of fresh california citrus, it's not surprising it's been called the best in the west. and it's yet another of the products that made the golden state a leading force in the world of agriculture. california is the leading producer of fresh citrus fruits. but as the industry has gotten larger, the size of the fruit has actualy gotten smaller. in fact, many think that this little guy may be
>> coming up on "california country," meet some of the folks resp@nsible for adding a little zest to our lives. then, what a chef wants, this man will find. tag along with us as we go on a produce pursuit in northern california. then, meet a farmer who is surrounded by his favorite things--his berries and his brothers. finally, think starting a vegetable garden is hard? our expert has advice to get you started and on your way to a homegrown meal in no time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so we all know that california is king when it comes to growing citrus. and when it comes to growing lemons, no one is bigger than this ventura county farm. and with over 7,000 acres of lush lemon trees, limoneira isn't just the biggest lemon grower in california, but in all of north america. based in santa paula, the farm is a testament to what hard work and determination can do. founding fathers nathan blanchard and wallace hardison first bought the land way back in 1893 and named the ranch limoneira, which means "lemon lands
[captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> coming up on "california country," learn how one woman is soaring with a sour fruit. >> they make everything taste a meyer lemon in tastes better because it has a meyer lemon it. >> then it's a delta favorite. learn why these spears are so special and why they'll have you singing for your supper. >> [singing in italian] >> then it's time to stop and smell and eat the roses at this unique farm. it's all ahead, and it starts now. welcome to "california country." i'm your host, tracy sellers. we're in the bay area today, enjoying a sweet taste of success, and ironically it's all based on one sour little fruit. if you've never tried a meyer lemon, then you may just be in the minority these days. softer, juicier, and sweeter than your common household eureka lemon, the meyer has quickly built a devoted following and one that includes karen morss. she is the epitome of the statement "when life hands you lemons, make lemonade," but in her case, she took it a step further and made a lemon empire. it all started back in 2004,
>> coming up on "california country," who said it isn't easy being green? not these folks. >> et voila. >> then we'll go behind the scenes to show you where some of the best chefs in the world go to school. >> i've had my time in the sun, as it were, and now, it's time for me to help other people get there. >> next, if you think beauty is only skin deep, wait until you see what this product is made of. >> you have no idea what you're doing for women and men. >> finally, it's time to salsa with our produce expert. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so you think great tasting food like this can't be great for you? well, the folks here in ventura county have a very simple message for you. just give greens a chance. just give them a chance. everyone wants to look good, feel better, and have more energy, and that's where these guys come in--dark, leafy greens. nutritionists call them the superheroes of the vegetable world. they say they are packed with vitamins "a," "c," and "k," as well as iron, calcium, and fiber. an
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)